12 responses

  1. Anonymous
    February 15, 2009

    I have had very good success with preparing my own beans without soaking first. I cook a large amount and then freeze what I don’t need right away. A question, though. I don’t usually add water to them when I get them ready to freeze. I generally let them cool and then just put them in a baggie. Does the water keep them better?

  2. AndiW
    February 15, 2009

    Jami, LOVE your common sense approach to home and garden. You have your own magazine here! :D I’m a die-hard Winco shopper and have watched their prices rise over the past 2 years. (Makes my nose hairs curl to shop anywhere else, not that I have that many nose hairs…) I love your comparison, how to and suggestion about beans. We enjoy beans, too. I’m going to try your idea. Thank you for sharing. Can’t wait to read the rest…

  3. Jami
    February 16, 2009

    To Anonymous:
    I use the water to keep them moist, like canned, but to be honest, I’ve not done it another way. If they come out of the freezer OK without the water – great! One less step. :)

  4. Anonymous
    April 22, 2011

    I hope you don’t mind but I wanted to give you the reason for soaking. The reason that you always soak beans was not to reduce cooking time although it does. There are phytotoxins in beans and other vegies. These phytotoxins are what cause digestive distress (gas/bloating,stomach distress) for many people if the beans are not soaked to allow these phytotoxins to be released into the water. You dump out the phytotoxins with the water, put in fresh water and cook. It does help my hubby greatly if I soak them first. A quicker method is to bring cleaned beans to a boil. Turn off the stove and let the beans sit for 1 hour. Drain off this water and add fresh water, then finish cooking. This too will help release those phytotoxins and make the beans easier to digest.
    Thanks and love your blog!

  5. Jami @An Oregon Cottage
    April 25, 2011

    Anonymous- Of course I don’t mind- I love comments! :-)

    I should mention (I’ll update the post), that I only do this for beans to freeze and I ALWAYS toss the first water, as we, too, have felt that “stomach distress” when I’ve used recipes that haven’t called for soaking (usually slow-cooker recipes…).

    If I soaked for beans I’m freezing, I’d throw out the soaking water and then toss the cooking water before packing in the freezer containers, so I skip the first step and just drain the cooking water.

    I do use the quick soak if I’m making the beans to eat that same day- it was good of you to point that out, thanks!

  6. Extraordinary Ordinary Life
    June 17, 2011

    I just tried canning them myself because I like the flavor and convenience of canned beans better. I do freeze them sometimes too. I will probably can more in the winter.

  7. Becky
    October 17, 2011

    GREAT idea. Like you, I never remember to soak and canned just doesn’t seem that expensive. But the store brand beans often have HFCS (why????). I am good at making/freezing stock, so this seems like another great option. Thanks!

  8. Anonymous
    November 27, 2011

    You have to figure the cost of electricity too, but this is the way to go…

  9. Becky Fowler
    January 26, 2012

    Can I ask what type/brand of containers you use for the freezer?

    • Jami @ An Oregon Cottage
      January 26, 2012

      Ask away, Becky! :-) I use the freezer containers you can buy in the canning section at grocery stores. I’ve had them for years, though, and I’m trying to move to glass, but don’t have nearly enough jars yet in the different sizes.

  10. Michael
    March 6, 2013

    I’d like to point out that the digestive problems from beans are not caused by “phytotoxins.” They are merely sugars — sugars that humans don’t digest well. Instead, bacteria in the gut digest them and produce gas. It has nothing to do with them being “toxic.” This is similar to the effect some people get from lactose (also a sugar), and explains why some people are more sensitive than others.

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